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Presentation Counts. So Does Substance.

Although I prefer to focus my attention on substance, you will notice that everything I present aims to be attractive.

There is a reason for that: I want people to pause to look at what I have to offer, and to read what I have to say.

A smile works far better than a frown, and a pretty image makes one stop to take a second look.

This isn’t something I spend most of my life on, but it counts.

I have given this website a makeover, streamlined its contents, and changed its aesthetics.

Presentation matters, whether we like it or not.

It feels superficial to focus on it, but I spent some time on it this weekend, and the results are worth it.

QueenBeeEdit now has 8 different banners for its header, which rotate at random.

(Note: the template of this site came with 3 banners, only one of which I liked, and they rotated at random, too.)

Here are the new banners:

1. A Beverly Sills pink iris.

2. A Victoria Falls blue iris.

3. A lavender-to-purple bearded iris.

4. A bearded, lavender Dutch iris with variegated leaves.

5. Natural honeycomb with honeybees working on it.

6. A pastel pink peony.

7. A raspberry pink peony.

8. A bee staring into the camera lens from a pink rose in Elizabeth Park, in Hartford, Connecticut, from its famous rose garden.

That last image was the toughest to get right.

I really wanted her to be shown looking right back at the viewer, so I had to tinker repeatedly with the cropping of the image and then wait for the software to rotate to it and show me the result.

It was worth it, though.

She’s staring, large in the header banner, right back at us.

Why would I bother with this?!

Research into website views advised me that this matters, for reasons of aesthetics and of having images relevant to one’s work.

This website is about nature, bees, honeybee colony collapse, insecticides and the laws, politicians, and corporations that threaten the bees, laws that can help the bees, and the plants that the bees pollinate and thus enable to grow and produce fruits, nuts, and flowers year after year.

We humans, who number over 7.6 billion at the time of this writing, need bees, fruits, nuts, and flowers, and yet we aren’t sufficiently careful to preserve and protect them.

Our species includes many who care far more for making immediate money, the future be damned.

This includes banksters and hedge fundsters, who seek the almighty monetary unit above all else, and corporatists, who manufacture insecticides and who clear vast swathes of land of vegetation that wildlife need in order to keep the ecosystems of the Earth – upon which we all, including them, depend – thriving.

I have written about them all in  2 allegorical tales – The Book of Thieves and The Bear Guarding the Beehive – which focus on each problem group:

 

To discuss all of these issues together, i.e. the “Farmers” (with a capital “F”) who view and treat the rest of our species plus all others as either a crop or a weed to use or erase as it suits them, plus human overpopulation, I have written the Nae-Nee series:

But back to what I did to this website and why: the idea is to make it look relevant to its content, and to show that I have bothered to put the effort into it.

Once done, it’s over, and I can get back to blogging, which is what I prefer to do.

Here is the bee again, looking at you:

Let’s hope we never stop seeing more just like her.

Bees forage over an area of roughly 2 miles/3 kilometers, but they can go farther – up to two or three times farther, so it matters whether or not any humans are spraying insecticides anywhere.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forage_(honey_bee)

And let’s make sure that we see more healthy bees, out foraging for pollen and nectar, by voting for politicians who are willing to refuse money from Farmer corporatists and enact laws that protect our shared ecosystem, and by not using insecticides.

Life is not only nicer but possible when we take care of what we have.

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